Healthy Eating Can Improve Bone Density in Women

Benefit of Consuming Low-Inflammatory Foods




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The importance of calcium for bone health in women is widely known. Now a new study suggests that a diet of foods considered low-inflammatory, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, may help reduce bone loss and fracture risk. Researchers from Ohio State University calculated the dietary inflammatory index (DII) of 160,191 participants using data from the Women’s Health Initiative clinical trials’ baseline food frequency questionnaires.

Comparative DII data were then recorded three and six years later among 10,290 study participants to determine any changes in their individual scores. Results were also compared with the number of hip fractures reported annually for the subjects, along with bone mineral density levels from the subgroup. Women with lower DII scores had less bone loss in their hips after six years.


This article appears in the June 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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