Inactive Lifestyle Accelerates Aging

Being Sedentary Associated with Shorter Telomere Lengths




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Getting off the couch and just moving may help slow the aging process in women that do not lead active lifestyles. Researchers from the University of California at San Diego measured the telomere lengths of white blood cells in 1,481 women between the ages of 64 and 95. Telomere lengths are a measure of aging within genes. After adjusting for other health and lifestyle factors, the researchers found that the women with less physical activity had shorter telomere lengths than those with more active lifestyles.


This article appears in the June 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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