Knitting Releases the Blues

Health Benefits of Needlework




Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

Knitting can alleviate the blues, slow the onset of dementia and distract from chronic pain, according to a survey published in The British Journal of Occupational Therapy. Eighty-one percent of respondents described feeling happier after a session of needlework. In another study, researchers at the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind-Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital found that the act of knitting lowers heart rates by an average of 11 beats per minute, eliciting a state of relaxation similar to that of yoga.

A Mayo Clinic study found that crafts like knitting and crocheting also reduce the chance of developing mild cognitive impairment by 28 percent. In a University of British Columbia study, 74 percent of 38 women with the eating disorder anorexia reported that it lessened the intensity of their fears and thoughts and cleared their minds of eating disorder preoccupations. In a survey of 1,000 members of the British group Knit for Peace, one in five respondents reported that knitting reduced their arthritic pain.


This article appears in the October 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

East Meets West at Still Point Ayurveda

Still Point Ayurveda a complete ayurveda holistic center in Philadelphia, offering the powerful and profound detoxification protocol called panchakarma.

Bug Apocalypse

The number of invertebrates and insects such as moths, butterflies and bees has dropped worldwide by 45 percent in the last 35 years, raising alarm about the global ecosystem.

Fish Revival

Following the removal two years ago of an obsolete dam, shad have returned to New Jersey’s Millstone River for the first time since 1845.

Horse Sense

The wild horse herds on North Carolina’s Outer Banks survived Hurricane Florence by huddling on high ground, hiding in maritime forests, and possibly by swimming.

Bat Cave Rescue

A fungus known as white-nose syndrome is decimating U.S. bat species, but scientists hope that genetic strategies and cave treatments will turn the situation around.

Add your comment: