Veggie Stuffed Peppers




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stuffed peppers are a very flexible meal that can be made with a variety of vegetables. Use extra filling to make a quick pasta dish, burrito or soup. No need for exact measurements, just make enough to fill peppers. Add some cooked Italian turkey sausage, great northern beans or lentils for added protein.

Roughly 3 cups (approx.) of any vegetables: artichoke hearts, asparagus, mushrooms, onions, spinach, swiss chard, yellow squash, zucchini

4 large bell peppers (any color)

1 Tbsp of Olive Oil

Dash of salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder

1 tsp of Italian seasoning and/or fresh basil

Sprinkle of grated cheese

1 large jar of tomato sauce

Wash and cut the tops off peppers, discard the stem. Scrape out seeds and membranes of each pepper and discard. Slice a little off the bottom to help peppers stand up straight in baking dish. Rub a little olive oil on the outside of the pepper.

Chop up veggies very small (including pepper tops). Heat olive oil in a large pan and add chopped veggies and seasonings.

Sauté for about 8-10 minutes until almost cooked through. Stir about 2 cups of tomato sauce into veggies.

Fill the peppers with the chopped veggies. Top peppers with sauce and a dash of grated cheese.

Cover and bake on 400 degrees for 20 mins. Take off the cover and cook for an additional 20 mins.

Serve over brown rice with remaining tomato sauce.

 

Recipe provided by Amazon.com bestseller Change Bites author Marissa Costonis. Visit changeBITES.com.

 

 

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