Black Restaurant Week




The second annual Black Restaurant Week will take place from June 9 through 23. The foundation of the Black Restaurant Week model is supporting culinary endeavors. This year they are partnering with F.A.R.M.S. to support their efforts to help rural small farmers.The premise of the program is to increase small farmer’s revenue and feed food insecure residents in their community. By purchasing produce from program farmers at competitive prices, the farmer generates enough money to cover minimum expenses like the payment of property tax to retain landownership. All purchased produce is donated to local foodbanks/pantries in the farmer’s communities.

F.A.R.M.S. is dedicated to providing legal and technical services to farmers of color in an effort to prevent the loss of landownership to build generational wealth and eradicate hunger in the farmers community. In five years of operation F.A.R.M.S. has donated nearly 300,000 pounds of produce in the South to hunger relief agencies

F.A.R.M.S. also provides estate planning and elder care abuse prevention services to small farmers, along with internships to young ladies interested in agriculture and book scholarships for agricultural science majors that are a child or a grandchild of a small farmer attending Tuskegee University.

For more information, visit phillybrw.com and 30000acres.org.

 

 

 

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